Cars today can look pretty boring when compared to vintage cars from the 50’s, but don’t worry the future of car design is about to change! Car concepts are a glimpse of what the future can hold for the car industry.

These are the most coolest concept cars from such famous car brands like BMW, Mazda, Toyota and Ford.  On top of futuristic cars, included is a range of vintage car concepts that a simply breathtaking.

Mazda Nagare Concept Car

The Nagare (pronounced “na-ga-re”) is a concept car that was introduced by Mazda at the 2006 Los Angeles Auto Show. The Nagare is considered to be an exercise in natural and organic car design to explore the future of Mazda automobiles. Its name “Nagare” translates into English as “flow” and the designers specifically studied motion and the effect it has on natural surroundings when creating this vehicle. It was designed by Laurens van den Acker, Mazda’s global design director, and his advanced design studio team in Irvine, California. The Mazda Nagare is a celebration of proportions and surface language according to its designers. Its bodylines flow like liquid across its smooth seamless design and there are no distinguishing marks that detract from the overall theme of the car. It has a large windshield that rakes at a very steep angle molding itself into the glass roof of the car. Its large and aggressive wheels are wrapped into the wheel wells, incorporating them as a part of the body.

BMW 42-wheeler

BMW has designed a 42-wheeled, 19 engine super sports car – all in order to help realise a four-year-old boy’s dream. The amazing invention was inspired by a reader of motoring website Jalopnik, who asked for help turning his nephew’s dream car into reality. On the site, reader ‘Ben’ said that his nephew Eli had very specific demands. First, the car had to be a BMW. Second, it had to have 42 wheels, 19 Porsche engines with 459 horsepower each (linked to a single transmission) and three steering wheels. The car also had to have a trunk full of toys. The reader asked for help from artists to realise the dream – and eventually BMW themselves decided to help. They produced this incredible – in all senses of the word – drawing, which totally fulfils the promise of Eli’s dream.

Toyota EX-III Concept Car (1969)

Shown at the 1969 Tokyo Motor Show, the EX-III was a big brother of a former concept model. The larger body was even more aerodynamic, being built very low with a pointed front (no bumper), a long bonnet, sharply sloped sides and a tapered rear. Large exhaust outlets hinted at a gas turbine engine but no details were given.

Magnet Car

The Magnet Car was designed by Mat˙ö Proch•czka as a solution to the challenge of finding more fuel efficient methods of transport. This car uses magnets the same polarity as the road, which effectively ‘lifts’ the car off the road, making it lighter by 50%. Of course, this is a true ‘concept car’, as magnetized roads are a purely hypothetical idea, and yet to be realized.

VW Buggy Up!

The Buggy Up! from Volkswagen features drainage holes in the cockpit and seats

Urban Concept by Audi

Audi’s Urban concept wasn’t short on drama. The two-seater uses a carbon-fibre monocoque and a pair of e-tron electric motors.

Ford Gyron (1961)

The Gyron looks like something out of the retrofuture envisioned in The Jetsons, the cartoon that began airing a year later. Featuring two wheels, the vehicle was stabilized by gyroscopes; at rest, legs would appear on either side to support the car. Ford built the two-seater for the 1961 Detroit Motor Show; it was never intended for production.

BMW Gina

Designed as a one-off concept by BMW designer Chris Bangle, the Gina is a fabric-skinned sports concept that is oddly good looking and weird at the same time. Knowing the Gina’s skin is completely made out of fabric does make this ‘car’ seem a bit of a black sheep, but BMW have never been shy when it comes to concepts, so perhaps we should have expected it.

Ferrari Monza

Part ‘what the hell is that?’ part motorcycle, part car; the Ferrari Monza concept is the Prancing Horse’s weirdest concept ever – and there’s been a few. The design is due to the Monza’s aerodynamic properties which are very good, apparently. What else can you say about it? It’s weird, that’s for sure.

Audi RSQ

The Bavarian’s are always battling for supremacy – whether it’s the Indian car market or cool concept cars, they love a good civil war. And Audi’s RSQ certainly does its best on the frontline. Looking back, we can now see where influences for many of Audi’s current cars came from. We can see TT, RS4 and R8 lines in there – it’s a concept car that hinted at the future for Audi, and we love it.

Renault Dezir Concept

Another 2010 Paris show-stopper, the Renault Dezir wowed the crowd with its sleek lines and bulging arches. According to Renault, the Dezir, if produced, would have 150hp – which isn’t a lot, but still, it looks good, so we’ll ignore the performance for now.

P-Eco

Although it looks a bit too sci-fi for the desert, The P-Eco vehicle definitely looks at home since the lack of a roof may prove annoying in other climates. Designed by Jung-Hoon Kim, the P-Eco vehicle is an electric car actually made to make life easier in the city.

eRinGo Concept Car

The eRinGo electric concept car is a ring-shaped vehicle that has a large wheel running around its center, while two medium sized wheels are present on each side. When the car is in motion, these wheels help it across turns, and when the car is still these wheels extend to provide balance and support. A rotor/ gyro system in the car helps it maintain balance on the single wheel. The two seater concept has steering wheels for both passengers, allowing either to take control.

Peugeot Egochine Concept Car

You thought the three-bar razor blade grille Ford’s using lately was Gillette-inspired, check out Egochine, a single-person, tripod finalist in the Peugeot design contest. Creator Paolo De Giusti says it’s “a vehicle built to carry a person very self-centered.” The car’s conceived with a hydrogen fuel cell in the fuselage mounted ahead of the rear-seated driver and powering a pair of electric motors turning to the front. It takes inspiration from the fabulously-bodied Isotta-Faschini’s and other coach-built classics. It also seems to You thought the three-bar razor blade grille Ford’s using lately was Gillette-inspired, check out Egochine, a single-person, tripod finalist in the Peugeot design contest. Creator Paolo De Giusti says it’s “a vehicle built to carry a person very self-centered.” The car’s conceived with a hydrogen fuel cell in the fuselage mounted ahead of the rear-seated driver and powering a pair of electric motors turning to the front. It takes inspiration from the fabulously-bodied Isotta-Faschini’s and other coach-built classics. It also seems to take inspiration from the Gillette Fusion Power razor.

BMW Lovos

Designer Anne Forschner noticed the mundanity of our mass-produced world, and created the Lovos concept to encourage viewers to “escape from the embrace of pleasant conformism.” The concept stands unique to draw attention towards its form, and is covered in particles and structures that when closed give an appearance of fish scales, and of a totally weird car when open. The concept has 260 identical interchangeable parts in its structure, most of these elements form the car’s fish scales. When open, these scales function as air brakes, and keep their direction towards the sun to harvest solar energy. Apart from the scales on the body, 12 scales cover each wheel of the car. As the wheels are set into motion, these scales retract to create a semblance of turbines.

Aurora Safety Car (1957)

The Aurora Safety car was a creation of American catholic priest Alfredo Juliano. Designed with safety for passengers and pedestrians as the only concern, the Aurora’s appearance was an afterthought. And the car has been hailed by many as the ugliest vehicle of all time. Safety features of this hideous creation include; saftey belts – rare in 1957, foam filled bumpers mounted on gas shocks, roll over bars built into the perspex dome roof, and a telescopic steering column. The Aurora’s rounded windscreen was intended to eliminate the need for windscreen wipers.

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