Ireland’s top 10 attractions are hard to choose as there are so many possible places to pick. Perched on the north western side of Europe. This island is the third largest in the Europe and the twentieth largest in the world. Ireland is set on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Ireland is often confused as being part of the United Kingdom.

Visiting Ireland : Ireland's Top Ten Attractions

Ireland’s Top Ten Attractions

However only the northernmost part of the land mass falls under UK territory. The remainder which occupies about five-sixths of the available land is known formally as the ‘Republic of Ireland’. Ireland is home to some of the most beautiful, rugged and inspirational landscapes, vistas and sights in the world.

Ireland welcomes people from around the globe with its genuine warmth and hospitality. The hills and the mountains provide shelter from the strong winds coming off the Atlantic ocean and the Irish sea. Ireland is also known affectionately as ‘The Emerald Isle.’

Visiting Ireland: The Top 10 Attractions to See in 2021

Following are the travelers top 10 most attractive places to visit in Ireland. Unique and remarkable places across this magnificent country. Ireland’s top 10 attractions that ought to be on any visitor to Ireland’s must see bucket list for anyone contemplating a trip to this part of western Europe in 2021.

So take a close look at why Ireland has so much to offer visitor of all interests and backgrounds. There is something for every traveler to see in Ireland, here we list our top 10 Irish attractions and places to visit on a trip to the Emerald Isle.

 

Discover quaint cottages and ancient castles and cities bursting with culture. This is Ireland, a truly amazing country to explore.

Discover quaint cottages and ancient castles and cities bursting with culture. This is Ireland, a truly amazing country to explore.

Use the slides to navigate your way through the top ten most attractive paces to visit in Ireland during 2017.

Visiting Ireland: Merrion Square, Dublin

The capital and the most populous city of Ireland, Dublin, is the friendliest city of Europe, which awaits your coming. There is so much to see and do in Dublin but wrap up warm. Start a visit to the city with a trip to Merrion Square.

Merrion Square in Dublin city has an abundance of obvious strengths that draw the gaze of visitors.

Merrion Square in Dublin city has an abundance of obvious strengths that draw the gaze of visitors.

One cannot stop exploring it, from its gracious parks of Merrion Square and Iveagh Gardens to the Drury Streets.

Merrion Square instills a strong Georgian heritage, with many cultural institutions, leisure facilities, and a distinctive political, social and scientific history.

Merrion Square was constructed 250 years ago in the year 1762. The square has fine Georgian Houses on three sides of the square. On the fourth side of Merrion Square can be found the garden of Leinster House, The National Gallery and Natural History Museum. Surely Dublin is worthy of being one of Ireland’s top 10 attractions.

 

Visiting Ireland: Antrim’s Giant Causeway

The UNESCO World Heritage Site, Antrim’s Giant Causeway, is scientifically a 60 million year old legacy to lava and surely one of Ireland’s top 10 attractions.

This stunning natural beauty amongst the rocks is the result of series of volcanic crashes, burning rocks and lava cooling events.

 

The Giant’s Causeway in Antrim, renowned for its unique polygonal columns of layered basalt rock is a sight not to be missed during a visit to Ireland. The causeway is most certainly essential bucket list material. The Giant’s Causeway was in 2015 awarded the United Kingdom’s Best Heritage Attraction at the British Travel Awards.

The Giant’s Causeway in Antrim is the product of a violent volcanic eruption some 60 million years ago. These special, unique rock formations are the focal point of a designated area of ‘Outstanding Natural Beauty’. The Giant’s Causeway has attracted visitors to Ireland for many centuries. It harbors a treasure trove of natural history and Irish culture.

Wild sea birds can frequently be observed off the wild coast around the Giant’s Causeway. Keen birdwatchers will note species such as fulmar, petrel and razorbill. The cliffs and rock formations are home to rare and unusual plant species. Enough to satisfy any wildlife enthusiast.

The Giants Causeway is also revered in local myth and Irish legends. Some people say that Giant’s Causeway was actually carved out from the coast by the fearsome giant, Finn McCool.

A giant who left in his wake a ancient home full of Irish folklore. When visiting the Giant’s Causeway in Antrim be sure to look out for the many clues of his existence. These clues include ‘The Giant’s Boot’ and Giant’s Wishing Chair.

 

 

Visiting Ireland: Boyne Valley

The archaeological site, Boyne Valley dates back to the ancient times of Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth. Ireland’s famous prehistoric site features the megalithic ancient tombs.

The ancient Boyne Valley is one of Ireland’s finest heritage sites. The Boyne valley is located just 30 minutes to the north of the commercial city of Dublin and is found in the North East of Ireland.

Visiting Ireland: Boyne Valley

Visiting Ireland: Boyne Valley

The valley is very accessible and can be  reached at the hub of four major motorway networks, these being the M1, M2, M3 and M4.
The Boyne Valley is located only half an hours drive time from Dublin International Airport.

A trip to Ireland must include some of the great things you can visit in Belfast. If traveling to see Boyne Valley by boat the convenient ferry ports in Dublin, Dun Laoghaire and Belfast are also in a good location. In Boyne valley visitors to Ireland will discover historical nature trails, ruined castles, ancient tombs and villages and plenty of panoramic scenic views.

Visiting Ireland : Ring of Kerry

 

Ring of Kerry encapsulates the magnificent gardens, ancient monuments, romantic castles, spectacular scenery and flamboyant towns and villages.

Visitors to Ireland’s ‘The Ring of Kerry’ will delight in experiencing a scenic drive around the Iveragh Peninsula that is to be found in southwest Ireland’s County Kerry.

Adding to its ring of scenic beauty is the culinary delight, like the local cheese, lamb, shellfish, seafood, and home made breads.

Adding to its ring of scenic beauty is the culinary delight, like the local cheese, lamb, shellfish, seafood, and home made breads.

 

The Iveragh Peninsula takes careful drivers along a 179km-long, circular route. Along the route the drive takes in rugged and wild coastal landscapes and ancient seaside villages.

During the drive at The Ring of Kerry drivers will encounter Skellig Michael. This is a rocky island that is home to an abandoned 7th century Christian monastery. For an island, Skellig Michael is a major destination point in Ireland.

There are many boats from the nearby Portmagee making the 12km crossing during the warmer spring and summer months. The village of Portmagee is located on the Iveragh peninsula south of Valentia Island.

Visiting Ireland: Cliffs of Moher

The view set on the Irelands west coastline of Cliffs of Moher is simply breathtaking and beyond easy words.

The Cliffs of Moher are in fact one of Irelands most visited natural wonders. The Cliffs of Moher possess an enchanting, captivating vista that holds the hearts of up to one million tourists that travel here every single year.

This iconic location in Ireland attracts millions of visitors per year, where people lose themselves to the beauty of nature and delve into the majestic cliffs.

This iconic location in Ireland attracts millions of visitors per year, where people lose themselves to the beauty of nature and delve into the majestic cliffs.

The cliffs are very tall indeed, rising 214m (702 feet) at their highest point. The cliffs run for 8 kilometers (5 miles) along the coastline of County Clare on the Atlantic side, west of Ireland. On a clear sky day visitors to the Cliffs of Moher can see the distant Aran Islands and Galway Bay. It is also possible to view the Twelve Pins and the Maum Turk mountains over in Connemara.

Move right across to the south of the Cliffs of Moher and to the Dingle Peninsula and Blasket Islands in Kerry. At this location O Briens Tower stands near the highest point of the cliffs. OBriens Tower has acted as a prime observation point on the cliffs for hundreds of years.

 

 

Visiting Ireland: Aran Islands

Set on the mouth of the Galway Bay is the Aran Islands, a group of 3 islands INISHMORE, INISHMAAN and INISHEER, on the west coast line of Ireland.

Visiting Ireland: Aran Islands

Visiting Ireland: Aran Islands

The Aran Islands are surely a highlight of the ‘Wild Atlantic Way.’ When visiting these islands be prepared to experience rugged cliffs and spectacular coastal views that stretch into the distance. These islands (Islands of Saints and Scholars) are to be found located just off Galway in the Atlantic.

A trip to these Atlantic facing islands is a true Irish experience where locals speak genuine Irish as well as English language. The Aran Islands are rich with celtic churches of historical importance dating back many centuries.

To experience the Irish culture, heritage and beauty of the Aran Islands a visitor should put several days aside for the trip. While staying on the islands visitors may explore the ancient castle forts, monuments and Celtic churches. Keen nature watchers will enjoy observing unique species of bird life and the distinct flora and fauna found on each of the islands.

Visiting Ireland: Burren

Burren is a unique destination to visit in Ireland where one has to stop at every hook and corner to closely look at things.

Burren offers visitors a rocky landscape that presents a vast cracked pavement of glacial-era limestone, stony cliffs and dark caves.

Burren offers visitors a rocky landscape that presents a vast cracked pavement of glacial-era limestone, stony cliffs and dark caves.

Eager amateur scientists visiting Burren will find ancient fossils, rock formations and remarkable archaeological sites to focus the mind.

Also found near the Burren on the wild Atlantic coast, the precipitous Cliffs of Moher to be found. These rugged cliffs are home to thousands of seabirds. Bird watchers will enjoy observing puffins and many other coastal birds and sea life.

Nearby Doolin is a well known center for experiencing traditional Irish music. The Burren is spectacular location in Country Clare. Primarily it is a limestone landscape and national park where visitors to this region of Ireland can observe over 700 different different flowering plants and ferns. The Burren accounts to 1% of the country of Irelands total landmass.

Visiting Ireland: Blarney Castle

The oldest castle of Ireland, The Blarney Castle, catches your eye. The main attraction is at the top of the castle is the Blarney Stone.

Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland, and the River Martin.

Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland, and the River Martin.

Blarney Castle has a legendary story that if you kiss the stone of Blarney Castle you will get the ‘gift of gab’, giving you the power to talk your way into and out of any situation. A useful skill if this were to be true.

Blarney Castle, as viewed by a castle visitor in modern times, is the third such castle to have been erected on the site. The first castle constructed way back in the tenth century was a wooden structure.

Later around 1210 A.D. this wooden fortification was replaced by a stone structure which had the new entrance to the castle placed some twenty feet above the ground on the north face. This second castle was later demolished for foundations.

Several centuries later in the year 1446 the third and final incarnation of Blarney Castle was constructed by Dermot McCarthy, King of Munster. Today it is the remnants of this ancient keep that still remains standing proud.

Visiting Ireland: The Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel is yet another must watch spectacular archaeological site of Ireland.

Visiting Ireland: The Rock of Cashel

Visiting Ireland: The Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel is best described as a magnificent group of ancient Medieval era buildings. These old historical structures are set on an outcrop of limestone in the Golden Vale. They include the 12th century built ’round tower’, which is 28 meters, or 90 feet high, dating from c.1100. Also on the site is the High Cross and a Romanesque style Chapel.

The Rock of Cashel is home to a 13th century Gothic cathedral, a 15th century keep and the restored Hall of the Vicars Choral. In all it offers visitors a prime insight into Medieval life across this period in Irish history.

Visiting Ireland: Croke Park Stadium

When visiting Ireland understand that Gaelic and hurling football are the two national sports of Ireland which take place at the Croke Park Stadium.

With the space for over 80,000 attendees, Croke Park is the fourth largest sports stadium in Europe. It’s not just a stadium but a spiritual home to the Irish Culture that is so famous across the world.

With the space for over 80,000 attendees, Croke Park is the fourth largest sports stadium in Europe. It’s not just a stadium but a spiritual home to the Irish Culture that is so famous across the world.

Croke Park stadium can accommodate all types of events – from field sports to rock concerts, religious meetings to industry trade shows and bespoke event banqueting. As a prime visitor attraction in the city of Dublin.

Croke Park is an important part of destination Dublin. The sports stadium offers tourists to the city a huge variety of day time activities including historical tours, theatre and sightseeing. The stadium is a lively hub for some of the most buzzy restaurants, bars, cafes and nightlife to be found anywhere in Europe.

Dublin city is world famous for its C Mile Filte (this phrase when translated means a hundred thousand welcomes.) Exactly the same warm Irish welcome, good fortune and world renowned hospitality awaits all new and returning visitors to Croke Park stadium in Dublin.

 

The Republic of Ireland is a must see destination for filling any European bucket list. The weather is best described as mixed and colder than England on average. A perfect climate for cultural pursuits.

Final Thought

Visiting Ireland brings majestic castles, ancient villages and picturesque rivers and valleys. Soak up the renowned Irish traditions and revel in the age old warm and hospitality that Ireland extends to its many visitors each year.

Ireland truly is the Emerald Isle. She will captivate and hold you from the moment you first set foot in this amazing part of western Europe.

 

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